Jacob Stewart

Jacob Stewart
Jacob Stewart is currently the Manager of Policy and Governmental Affairs at Child Care Aware® of America. Prior to this, he worked for a U.S. Senator, received his Master’s in Public Policy from the University of Cambridge, and taught 7th- and 8th-grade math in a public school for three years.

Recent Posts

2020 Census Series: January

By Jacob Stewart on January 14, 2020

Happy New Year! It's finally 2020, Census year. You've been preparing and now it's here.  While the Census will occur throughout the year, in some parts of the country the count will begin as early as this month.  

New research shows that much work needs to be done to help families understand the importance of participating in the Census. Child care providers and Child Care Resource and Referral Agencies (CCR&Rs) can play an important role sharing these messages. 

Topics: Systems Building, Family & Community Engagement, Policy & Advocacy

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Child Care Aware® of America Speaks Out Against Deregulation; in Support of Investments

By Jacob Stewart on December 10, 2019

Child Care Aware® of America has responded to the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) at the Department of Health and Human Services and their notice for a request for information (RFI) on “Improving Access to Affordable, High Quality Child Care.” 

Topics: Policy & Advocacy

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The Child Care Supply Crisis: Why Deregulation Is Not The Answer

By Jacob Stewart on October 28, 2019

Over the past few years, legislators and state administrators have noticed an alarming trend: a substantial decline in the number of child care providers. How much of a decline? Well, according to the National Center on Early Childhood Quality Assurance, the number of small, licensed family child care homes fell by 35between 2011 and 2017 

Topics: Policy & Advocacy

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Why August is This Year’s Most Crucial Month for Advocacy

By Jacob Stewart on August 12, 2019

As the last full month of summer, August is usually filled with vacations and back-to-school planning. This August, however, will also be 2019’s most crucial month for child care advocacy. Here’s why:  

Last month, immediately before their August recess, Congress finally approved a deal to raise the spending caps through FY2021. Under this deal, non-defense discretionary funding—the budget category that funds a wide array of programs—will receive an increase of $56.2 billion over two years from FY2019 levels.  This was an important first step for securing increased federal investments in child care and early learning programs such as CCDBG and Head Start. 

Topics: Policy & Advocacy

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Why 2019 Is a Critical Year for Child Care

By Jacob Stewart on December 21, 2018

 This past year was huge for child care.

In February, Congress finally reached a bipartisan agreement on the federal budget. The Bipartisan Budget Act of 2018 not only provided billions in “new” discretionary funding for the next two fiscal years but specifically pledged to double investments for child care.

In March, Congress then passed the FY2018 Omnibus bill, which included a historic $2.37 billion increase for the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG). Six months later, Congress provided an additional $50 million to CCDBG while simultaneously increasing funding for other key programs like Head Start ($200 million).

These wins in early childhood funding should certainly be celebrated. But this celebration also needs a caveat: that for FY2020, we need to ensure this funding remains a priority for the 116th Congress.

Topics: Policy & Advocacy

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