Research Round Up: Food Allergies

By Jessica Rose-Malm on January 16, 2020

Understanding Food Allergy Education Needs in Early Childhood Schools 

Fierstein, J.L., Chadha, A.S., Valaika, S.S., and Gupta, R.S. Annals of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology (November 2019). 

Background: Food allergies affect 5.6 million children in the United States, including about 8% of pre-Kindergarten children. Children in early care and education programs are at a particularly high risk for allergic reactions due to cross-contamination of foods, label-reading errors, and accidental ingestion. Early childhood educators need to be trained in how to manage food allergy risks and respond to allergic reactions, but much of the training they receive is modified from trainings for school-age teachers. This study looks at how often early childhood educators manage food allergies and what they need from food allergy trainings.   

Topics: Health & Safety

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Research Round Up: Screen Time

By Jessica Rose-Malm on January 15, 2020

Associations Between Screen-Based Media Use and Brain White Matter Integrity in Preschool-Aged Children Hutton, J.S., Dudley, J., Horowitz-Kraus, T., DeWitt, T., and Holland, S.K. JAMA Pediatrics (November 2019). 

Background: Many children under age 6 regularly spend time in front of TVs, computers and digital devices. Research shows that too much screen time at an early age can affect children’s behavior and cognitive development. The American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) recommends limiting screen time, viewing along with adults, and accessing only educational, developmentally-appropriate content. This study looks at the connection between screen time and development in the parts of the brain responsible for language and literacy.  

Topics: Health & Safety

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Health Resource Spotlight: Workplace Stress

By Laurie Rackas on January 14, 2020

 

The Problem

Child care professionals are aware that workplace stress can affect their physical and emotional health. They many want to reduce their stress levels, but need help identifying and implementing effective strategies. 

Topics: Health & Safety

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Research Round Up: Infectious Disease

By Jessica Rose-Malm on December 11, 2019

Association of Seasonal Severity and Vaccine Effectiveness with Influenza Vaccination Rates in Children

Abraham, C., Chen, Q., Fan, W., Stockwell, M. Journal of the American Medical Association Pediatrics (November 2019).

Background: Childhood vaccination rates for the flu tend to be much lower than vaccination rates for other diseases. The percentage of children receiving the flu vaccine has dropped in recent years, despite efforts by doctors and the public health field to encourage parents to vaccinate their children. This study looks at the relationship between flu severity, flu vaccine effectiveness and parents’ decisions about whether to vaccinate their children. 

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Health Resource Spotlight: Caring for Children with Special Needs & Good Oral Health in Child Care

By Laurie Rackas on December 10, 2019

 

Caring for Children with Special Needs

The Problem

Some providers may be – for the first time – serving a child who has a disability or special needs. They likely will have to modify their setting in small ways to create an inclusive environment. Where do they begin? 

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Research Round Up: Nutrition

By Jessica Rose-Malm on December 09, 2019

Association of WIC Participation and Growth and Developmental Outcomes in High-Risk Infants 

Lakshmanan, A., Song, A., Flores-Fenlon, N., Parti, U., Vanderbilt, D., Friedlich, P., Williams, R., Kipke, M. Clinical Pediatrics (October 2019). 

Background: Nutrition is critical for healthy brain development in infants and toddlers, particularly those who are born prematurely. Federal food programs like Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) have been shown to help infants from low-income families get more vitamins and important nutrients that they need. This study looked at whether participating in public food assistance programs like WIC leads to better development in premature infants discharged from neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). 

Topics: Health & Safety

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