The COVID-19 math doesn’t work for Washington’s child care providers

By Lynette Fraga, Ph.D. on October 25, 2020

Spokane Spokesman-Review

Op-ed by Lynette M. Fraga, Ph.D., CEO of Child Care Aware of America, and Deeann Puffert, CEO of Child Care Aware of Washington.

This is a critical time for our economy. It is also a critical time for the most important workforce support of all – child care. Parents cannot work, no matter how essential they are, if they do not have child care for their children. Earlier this spring, nearly 6% of Washington nurses who responded to a survey reported they had to use sick time, or not work at all, due to not having child care.

Now, with many K-12 schools offering remote learning only, many more children are in need of child care who previously attended elementary schools. Yet our state’s child care programs are struggling to keep their doors open, and many have closed.

...

High-quality child care programs don’t just fall from the sky whenever they are needed. They are built over time upon a foundation of trust, health and safety guidelines and small business ingenuity.

That’s why Child Care Aware of America and Child Care Aware of Washington are asking Congress to invest in the long-term stability and success of our country’s child care system.

We would never expect our K-12 educational system to struggle month after month with only stopgap funding, and then expect it to be 100% ready for in-person instruction when the pandemic subsides.

We cannot expect it of our mostly privately funded child care system either.

Investments reveal what matters. Investing in America’s children, families and workforce matters.

For Washington’s and the nation’s economy to reopen after the COVID-19 threat subsides, millions of families will need safe, affordable child care. Let’s make sure it will be there for all with robust public investment.

Read the full op-ed.

Topics: Media Mention

Continue Reading

Can I Safely Send My Kid to Day Care? We Asked the Experts

By CCAoA on October 22, 2020

New York Times

In a report of U.S. child care facilities released on Sept. 24, Child Care Aware of America, a nonprofit advocacy group for providers, found that nationwide, 35 percent of nonresidential child care centers and 21 percent of in-home child care facilities that had been open before the pandemic had closed by July.

According to the largest study of its kind, published in the journal Pediatrics, researchers from Yale and Columbia surveyed more than 57,000 child care providers across 50 states plus Washington, D.C. and Puerto Rico between May and June. They found no relationship between working in day cares and contracting or being hospitalized for Covid-19, regardless of race, ethnicity or other factors.

“Child care providers who reported to work during the first three months of the pandemic were no more likely to contract Covid-19 than those who did not report to work,” said Walter Gilliam, a psychologist and early childhood and education policy researcher at the Yale Child Study Center, who led the study. Most facilities in the study followed careful safety protocols.

But, he added, “If the transmission rate is high in your community, of course it’s going to get into your child care program.”

Read the full article.

Topics: Media Mention

Continue Reading

Yale Study Finds No Correlation Between Child Care Centers and Coronavirus Transmission

By CCAoA on October 20, 2020

Cheddar

First large-scale study finds child care is not associated with the spread of Covid-19. Cheddar's Hena Doba is joined by Yale University Professor and lead on the study, Walter Gilliam, and Child Care Aware of America CEO Lynette Fraga.

Watch the interview.

Topics: Media Mention

Continue Reading

Lynette M. Fraga Discusses the New Study that Child Care Is Not Linked to COVID

By CCAoA on October 16, 2020

SiriusXM, Press Pool with Julie Mason

Lynette M. Fraga, Ph.D., CEO of Child Care Aware of America, discusses the Yale study and the heroic efforts of child care providers to prevent the spread of COVID-19.

Listen to the interview.

Topics: Media Mention

Continue Reading

Daycare Centers Are Very Low Risk for Covid-19 Transmission, Study Says

By CCAoA on October 14, 2020

Wall Street Journal

Children in daycare programs present virtually no risk of transmitting Covid-19 to adults, according to a new Yale University study of more than 57,000 U.S. child-care providers. 

The study, believed to be the largest of its kind, indicated that keeping child-care centers open doesn’t contribute to transmission of the disease caused by the new coronavirus, as long as they hew to sanitary guidelines like hand washing, small group sizes and staff wearing face coverings. 

The research has broad implications for the U.S. economy, parents who depend on daycare centers and child-care workers. More than a third of child-care centers in the country closed between March and July, according to Child Care Aware, an advocacy group. 

Read more.

Topics: Media Mention

Continue Reading

Child Care Centers Are Not Linked to COVID Spread, According to Large Study

By CCAoA on October 14, 2020

People.com

A new study conducted by Yale University has found that child care centers are not linked to the spread of the coronavirus, as long as safety protocols and guidelines are followed.

In the study published Wednesday in Pediatrics — the peer-reviewed journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics — researchers surveyed 57,000 child care providers across all 50 states, plus Washington, D.C. and Puerto Rico, that remained open through the height of the pandemic.

Lynette Fraga, the CEO of Child Care Aware of America, who also participated in the study, also noted to Today that the study's results depend on workers and centers taking the extra safety precautions.

"This study shows that to be open safely, child care providers will need to practice mitigation and prevention strategies which cost money," Fraga said. "And, at times, it may not be safe for child care to be open if community transmission rates are high. To stabilize an industry facing additional costs and ongoing, public health-related closures, significant funding is needed."

Read the full article.

Topics: Media Mention

Continue Reading

Child care programs not associated with COVID-19 spread, large study finds

By CCAoA on October 14, 2020

TODAY.com 

A large-scale study conducted by Yale University found that child care is not associated with the spread of the coronavirus.

The study, published in Pediatrics, the peer-reviewed journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics, found that child care programs that stayed open throughout the pandemic did not contribute to the spread of the virus to providers if those child care programs were in areas with low COVID-19 spread and took multiple safety measures, including disinfecting surfaces, hand washing, screening for symptoms, social distancing, masking and limiting group sizes.

Lynette Fraga, Ph.D., the CEO of Child Care Aware of America (a resource to help families access quality, affordable child care), which participated in the study and offered recommendations based on its results, said that the study shows that it can be possible to reopen child care safely as long as appropriate measures are taken.

"This study shows that to be open safely, child care providers will need to practice mitigation and prevention strategies which cost money," Fraga said. "And, at times, it may not be safe for child care to be open if community transmission rates are high. To stabilize an industry facing additional costs and ongoing, public health-related closures, significant funding is needed."

Read the full article.

Topics: Media Mention

Continue Reading

Report: Fewer family childcare providers with pandemic taking toll

By CCAoA on October 04, 2020

Forum News Service (ND, SD, MN, WI)

The number of childcare facilities continues to slump in the Upper Midwest, and it’s likely the COVID-19 pandemic will take a further toll, according to recently released annual tracking report and multiple surveys by organizations who monitor child care options.

Particularly hard hit in Minnesota, North Dakota and South Dakota are family providers, a major piece of the childcare puzzle in largely rural states, where families set up their own, often in-home facilities to care for their friends' and neighbors' children.

"With a spread-out, rural setting, it seems to be more feasible, oftentimes, to have family childcare," said Dionne Dobbins, senior director of research at Child Care Aware of America, an advocacy group which released the report in conjunction with its new Child Care Data Center funded by the the Robert Wood Johnson Foundation.

The state by state data summarized key findings from data collected in 2019 and partial 2020 information and included Child Care Aware's summary of the pandemic's effects based on 88 surveys on the topic conducted by nonprofits and gathered by The Urban Institute.

Very few organizations track child care providers, cost and access at a state by state level. Dobbins, with Child Care Aware, said the organization sees the data gathering as a crucial part of understanding the national child care situation, and a key component of advocacy.

“The childcare system in and of itself is fragmented and inequitable and inaccessible and underfunded, and I would say the data pieces of that childcare system are the same," Dobbins said. "We know we need good data, we need standardized data, we need similar data across the country to understand both the landscape and understand where things are equitable and inequitable."

Read the full article.

Topics: Media Mention

Continue Reading

Mothers in the workplace at a 'tipping point' amid the pandemic, child care crisis

By CCAoA on October 01, 2020

Good Morning America/ABCNews.com

At the same time women face a gender pay gap where they earn around 80 cents for each dollar their male co-workers make, the costs of child care now exceed $20,000 per year in nearly two dozen states, according to Child Care Aware of America, a nonprofit organization that works to make child care in the U.S. high-quality and affordable.

Also not enough, advocates say, are the state policies that popped up to try to help child care centers during the pandemic.

"A lot of those were temporary fixes and may not be extended as states reopen," said Lynette Fraga, Ph.D., CEO of Child Care Aware of America. "There is no doubt that a federal solution is absolutely necessary, and a federal investment, supported by state solutions and state-by-state policies, that can raise up that federal solution."

Read full article.

Topics: Media Mention

Continue Reading

National report warns crumbling child care industry will slow economic recovery in Washington state and beyond

By CCAoA on September 26, 2020

Seattle Times

Without child care, there can be no economic recovery from the pandemic.

Those are the dire consequences that can transpire if the government doesn’t give more financial assistance to U.S. child care providers, including those in Washington state, a new report warns.

Since July, nationwide, 40% of child care centers and 27% of home-based child care providers closed, according to research compiled by Child Care Aware of America, a national child care advocacy organization. The causes, Child Care Aware found, were dropping attendance in child care facilities and extra costs associated with the pandemic.

Read the full article.

Topics: Media Mention

Continue Reading